It looks like it’s going to be even easier to register a property. The Land Registry has announced plans to expand its powers into England and Wales, becoming the only registering authority for Local Land Charges in the jurisdiction, the government department announced in a press release.

By doing so, the authority will introduce a standardised national property registration fee to the two countries. This will replace the current system that relies on 348 separate local authorities, delivering fees that vary from £3 and £96 and turnaround within one to 42 days.

Along with the standard fee, the Land Registry also plans to deliver a standardised digital service. It’s expected to bring a more streamlined conveyancing process and better access to property information. Another thing the change intends to put an end to is the “postcode lottery” – the way postcodes are allocated with little consideration about boundaries between local authorities.

According to the department’s chief executive and chief land registrar Ed Lester, the proposed change is meant to ease the process of buying property in England and Wales, by employing the governments’ “digital by default” agenda. Also, by digitising its services, the government hopes to make public data more easily accessible, which in turn would benefit the whole economy.

For the change to happen, the Land Registration Act 2002 and the Local Land Charges Act 1975 should both be modified accordingly via the proposed Infrastructure Bill. It is expected to pass in parliament by next March, after which preparation for the transition will be carried out until April. The process itself is expected to take place in the second half of 2015.

Do you think this will help ease the process of buying property?

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